Emausaurus Dinosaur

Emausaurus Dinosaur - 2

Origin

In the summer of 1963 in Grimmen, about 20 km from Greifswald in northern Germany, researcher Werner Ernst discovered the fossil remains of a herbivorous dinosaur who lived in the Mezozoic era, during the Jurassic period, about 190-180 million years after.

The species was described in 1991 by the paleontologist Hartmut Haubold and called Emausaurus ernst in honor of the discoverer Dr. Werner Ernst – employed at the Geological Institute of the University of Greifswald. Also, the name Emausaurus started from the acronym EMAU inspired by Ernst Moritz Arndt University.

The partial skeleton of this dinosaur was exposed at the University of Greifswald, and according to specialists it is the only specimen of its kind worldwide.

The University has provided paleontologists with funds for the restoration of the discovered fossils, as their preservation was very important. Also in front of the University of Greifswald was a bronze sculpture of this dinosaur.

The researchers estimated the length of an adult specimen at 2 m, the height at 0.7 m and the weight at 40 kg. It had a back-shielded body with numerous sharp and protruding bones that stretched from the neck to the tip of the tail.

His only vulnerable parts were the flanks and the abdomen. It moves both bipedal and all four long, muscular ends with long fingers and sharp claws.

Emausaurus’s Food

The almost complete skull of this prehistoric animal – through the shape of the teeth and the jaw – provided the necessary data to establish that Emausaurus was a large herbivor that populated the forested areas near the water courses.

He had a long nose, finished with a teethless, curved beak, with which he could pull off the ground-level plants. The jaws were not very strong, they had teeth-shaped teeth for partially chopping up the vegetable pieces, then the food came to the stomach where it was ground by stomach stones – called gastrolites – that Emausaurus swallowed in the desire to ease digestion.

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